Blog Lessons Full Plan (Hidden)



The full curriculum

1) (Jazz) Music Theory

1A Understanding chords and scales

1B Major Scales

  • Lesson 1 – Construction of the major scale

1C Minor Scales (melodic, harmonic, natural)

  • Lesson 1 – Construction of the melodic minor scale
  • Lesson 2 – Construction of the harmonic minor scale
  • Lesson 3 – Understanding the natural minor scale

1D Triads (major, minor, diminished, augmented)

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding triads
  • Lesson 2 – Construction of the four triad types
    • C (major)
    • Cm (minor)
    • Cdim (diminished)
    • Caug (augmented)

1E Four note chords

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding four note chords
  • Lesson 1 – Constructing the six four note chords
    • Cmaj7 (major seven)
    • Cm7 (minor seven)
    • C7 ( (dominant) seven)
    • Cm7b5 (half-diminished / minor seventh)
    • Cdim7 (diminished (seven) )
    • CmMaj7 (minor-major seven)

1F Chord inversions

1G Extensions and alterations

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding extensions and alterations
  • Lesson 2 – Extensions 9-11-13
    • Specific extensions for different chord types
  • Lesson 3 – Alterations b9-#9-#11-b13
    • Specific alterations for different chord types

1H Degrees

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding degrees
  • Lesson 2 – Major scale degrees

1I 2-5-1s

1J Chord Pairs

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding 2-5-1s and chord pairs
    • Major 2-5-1 (ii-V7-I)
    • Minor 2-5-1 (iiø-V7b9-i)
    • Diatonic 2-5 chords
  • Lesson 2 – Basic major diatonic chord pairs
    • ii-V7
    • iii-vi
    • IV-viiø
  • Lesson 3 – Minor diatonic chord pairs
    • iiø-V7b9
    • iiiø-VI7b9
    • #ivø-VII7b9
  • Lesson 4 – Additional diatonic chord pairs
    • viiø-iii
    • IV-iv
    • IV-bVII7(#11)
  • Lesson 5 – Substitutions in diatonic chord pairs
    • ii- chord substitutions
    • V- chord substitutions
  • Lesson 6 – Adding chords and passing chords
    • Before ii- chords
    • Before V-chords

1K Progressions

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding progressions
  • Lesson 2 – Basic diatonic progressions for practice I
    • Four chord progressions
      • Major 2-5-1-6
      • Major 1-6-2-5
      • Minor 2-5-1-6 and 2-5-1-4
      • Minor 1-6-2-5
  • Lesson 3 – Basic diatonic progressions for practice II
    • Eight chord progressions
      • Major 2-5-3-6-2-5-1-6
      • Minor 2-5-3-6-2-5-1-6
      • Major 4-7-3-6-2-5-1-1^7
      • Minor #4-7-3-6-2-5-1-1^7
  • Lesson 3 – Basic diatonic progressions for practice III
    • “Full diatonic progression” (16 chords) with both major and minor chord pairs
      • (M)4-7-3-6-2-5-(m)3-6-#4-7-3-6-2-5-(M)1-1^7
  • Lesson 4 – Other common progressions
    • TWNBAY A-part
    • RC A-part
    • Blues simple
    • Blues jazz

1L Additional information (Jazz Music Theory)

  • Minor scale degrees

1M Pop/Rock (Jazz Music Theory)

2) (Jazz) Chords And Voicings

2A Understanding chords and voicings

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding chords and voicings
    • What is a voicing?
    • Specific information regarding voicings
    • Typical names of common voicings

2B Voicing types

  • Lesson 1 – Simple voicing for triads and four note chords
  • Lesson 2- 2 note vocings
    • 2 note shell voicings
      • 1-3 and 1-10
      • 1-7
    • 2 note rootless shell voicings
      • 3-7 and 7-3
    • 2 note quartal voicings
      • 1-4
      • 1-5
    • 2 note rootless quartal voicings
      • 4-7
  • Lesson 3- 3 note voicings
    • 3 note shell vocings
      • 1-3-7
      • 7-1-3
      • 1-7-10
    • 3 note rootless voicings
      • 3-7-9
      • 7-3-6
    • 3 note “Triad” voicings
      • 3-5-9 plus inversions
      • Other Triads under Lesson 5-6 “Upper structure”
    • 3 note quartal voicings
      • 1-4-7
      • 1-5-9
    • 3 note quartal rootless voicings
      • 4-7-3
    • 3 note “Open” voicings
      • 1-5-10
    • 3 note “Open” rootless voicings
      • 3-1-5 (3-8-12)
  • Lesson 4 – 4 note voicings (most standard)
    • Basic 4 note voicings
      • 1-3-5-7
    • Rootless 4 note voicings (“AB”/”Bill Evans”/”Box” voicings)
      • Position A – 3-5-7-9
      • Position B – 7-9-3-5
    • 4 note quartal voicings
      • 1-4-7-10
      • 1-5-9-13
    • 4 note rootless quartal voicings
      • 4-7-10-13
      • 5-9-13-10
    • 4 note rootless “Kenny Barron” voicings
      • 5-9-10-7
  • Lesson 5 – Other voicings
    • Kenny Barron (full) voicing
      • 1-5-9-10-7-11
    • 11 and sus voicings
      • Rootless AB voicings with 4 instead of 5
      • (Upper structure – major triad based on the b7 of chord)
    • 7#11 voicings
      • 1-3-5-b6 “superchord” (triad plus added b6) with inversions based on the 2 of chord
    • Slash chords
      • One hand
      • Two hands
  • Lesson 6 – Upper structure I
    • Understanding upper structure voicings
      • Major chord upper structure (Cmaj7 and variants)
      • Minor chord upper structure (Cm7, CmMaj7 and Cm6/9)
      • Half-diminished chord upper structure (Cm7b5)
  • Lesson 7 – Upper structure II (Dominant chords)
    • “Clean” dominant (C7)
    • Dominant with extensions (C9 / C13)
    • Dominant with alterations (C7b9 / C13b9 / C#9 / C7#9b13=C7b9b13=C7alt / C7#11)

2C How to play voicings properly

  • Lesson 1 – Fundamentals of voicing chord pairs
    • “Wide” to “Narrow” concept
    • Minimal movement concept
    • Exceptions to the “rules”
  • Lesson 2 – Adapting voicings to usual chord pairs I
    • 5-1 (and variants)
    • major 2-5 (and variants)
    • minor 2-5
    • 1-6 (and variants)
    • 4-7 (and variants)
    • 1-5
  • Lesson 3 – Adapting voicings to unusual chord pairs II
    • 2-b2
    • 1-3 (and variants)
    • 1-#1
  • Lesson 4 – Adapting patterns to diatonic turnarounds and progressions
    • 2-5-1-6 (minor and major)
    • 4-7-3-6-2-5-1
    • “Full progression”
    • Other progressions / Songs

2D Left hand only, Right hand only or both hands? (Voicings)

  • Lesson 1 -When to play left hand, right hand or both hands
    • Playing left hand only
    • Playing right hand only
    • Playing both hands
  • Lesson 2 – How to “split” voicings for two hands
    • Containing the root
      • LH Options
      • RH Options
        • Triads (upper structure)
        • Quartal
    • Rootless
      • LH Options
      • RH Options
        • Triads (upper structure)
        • Quartal
    • Other
      • “Drop 2” and “Drop 4”

2E Additional information (Jazz Chords and Voicings)

  • Chords and voicings for pop/rock piano

3) Jazz Comping and Rhythm

3A Comping rhythms

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding comping and rhythm
  • Lesson 2 – Basic comping rhythm patterns
  • Lesson 3 – More advanced comping rhythm patterns

3B Walking bass

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding walking bass
    • Specific information regarding walking bass
      • “Normal” chord pairs
      • Static chords
      • Double time / half time
      • Diatonic/chromatic approach
      • 3/4 and 6/4 time
  • Lesson 2 – Walking bass patterns
    • “Upwalk”
    • “Downwalk”
    • “1-3-5 Triad”
    • “1-5-3 Triad”
    • Other
  • Lesson 2 – Adapting patterns to usual chord pairs I
    • 5-1 (and variants)
    • major 2-5 (and variants)
    • minor 2-5
    • 1-6 (and variants)
    • 4-7 (and variants)
    • 1-5
  • Lesson 3 – Adapting patterns to unusual chord pairs II
    • 2-b2
    • 1-3 (and variants)
    • 1-#1
  • Lesson 4 – Adapting patterns to diatonic turnarounds and progressions
    • 2-5-1-6 (minor and major)
    • 4-7-3-6-2-5-1
    • “Full progression”
    • Other progressions / songs

3C Stride

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding stride piano
    • Specific information regarding stride piano
      • Left hand
      • Right hand

3C Additional information (Jazz Comping and Rhythm)

  • C

4) Soloing and improvisation

The three way approach to improvisation

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding the three way approach to improvisation
    • 1- Theory approach (what to play)
    • 2- Rhythm approach (when to play)
    • 3- Musicality approach (how to play)

4A Theory approach (what to play)

4A i) Simple scales for improvisation (Diatonic and “superchord” scales)

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding diatonic and “superchord” scales
    • Information regarding the diatonic scales
    • Information regarding the “superchord” scales
  • Lesson 2 – Adapting diatonic and “superchord” scales to diatonic turnarounds and progressions
    • 2-5-1-6 (major)
    • 4-7-3-6-2-5-1
    • “Full progression”

4A ii) Chord-scale relationship

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding the chord-scale relationship
    • Information regarding the chord-scale relationship
  • Lesson 2 – Additional scales to the major-minor scales
    • Diminished scale
    • Whole tone scale
    • Blues scales
      • Minor blues scale
      • Major blues scale
      • “Augmented (major) blues scale”
      • “Full blues scale”
    • Pentatonic scale
    • Block chord scale (“George Shearing” chords)
    • “Superscale” (1-2-3-4-5-b6)
  • Lesson 3 – Scales for chord types I
    • Major chord (Cmaj7 and variants)
    • Minor chord (Cm7, CmMaj7 and Cm6/9)
    • Half-diminished (Cm7b5)
    • Diminished chord (Co7)
  • Lesson 4 – Scales for chord types II (Dominant chords)
    • “Clean” dominant (C7)
    • Dominant with extensions (C9 / C13)
    • Dominant with alterations (C7b9 / C13b9 / C#9 / C7#9b13=C7b9b13=C7alt / C7#11)

4A iii) Target notes

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding target notes
    • Information regarding target notes
  • Lesson 2 – Targeting notes of the chord (what and when)
    • the 3rd
    • the 5th
    • the 7th
    • Extensions (9,11,13)
    • Alterations (b9,#9,#11,b13=#5)
  • Lesson 3 – Adapting patterns to diatonic turnarounds and progressions
    • 2-5-1-6 (minor and major)
    • 4-7-3-6-2-5-1
    • “Full progression”
    • Other progressions / Songs

4B Rhythm approach (when to play)

4B  “Rhytmic syllables”

  • Lesson 1 – What are “rhythmic syllables”
  • Lesson 2 – the different rhythmic syllables
    • “Bronx” (quarter note)
    • “New York” (eight note)
    • “Tennessee” (triplet)
    • “Mississippi” (sixteenth note)
  • Lesson 3 – Using breaks to create patterns
  • Lesson 4 – Double time
  • Lesson 5 – Adaption over progressions
    • 2-5-1-6 (minor and major)
    • 4-7-3-6-2-5-1
    • “Full progression”
    • Other progressions / Songs

4C Musicality approach (how to play)

4C i)  Call and response

  • Lesson 1 – What is call and response
  • Lesson 2 – Different ways to practice call and response
    • Melody based phrases
    • Different duration of call and response (2-2 / 1-1 bar sequence)
    • Ending phrases

4C ii)  Practicing patience and pacing

  • Lesson 1 – Using breaks during improvisation
    • 1-1 / 1-2 / 1-3 bar sequence
    • Making lines have a meaning

4C iii)  Practicing making musical phrases and contour

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding direction and movement
    • Using a target note as an anchor
    • Making movement
    • Skips vs. linear movement
    • Repeated movement/phrases

4C iv)  Interaction between the hands

  • Lesson 1 – Understanding interaction between the hands
    • Call and response between hands
    • Imitating jazz ensemble settings with a piano

4D Additional information (Soloing and improvisation)

  • Improvisation for pop/rock piano

5 “Lesson Leftovers”

  • What are the “Lesson Leftovers”?
  • Are all keys created equal? (Should I practice all keys?)
  • Optimising practice methods and time for busy people

(c) Sibil Yanev 2019